You’ve created a new logo for your brand.

It might look great. But is it really ready to be launched into the world?

To maximise the effectiveness and usability of your logo it’s important it passes certain tests.

Let’s explore some of the tests you should perform before sharing your logo with the world.


Black and white test

Testing your logo in black and white is a great way to ensure it can be applied in as many situations as possible. After all, sometimes we can’t use colour – think of newspapers and imprints on certain materials. Colour plays an important role in logo recognition. Without the use of colour it’s more difficult to recognise a logo. So if your logo is recognisable without colour, you can be confident it’s a strong concept.

Black and white test

Black and white test



Background test

You often need to use your logo on a dark or light background in different circumstances. For example, you should use a dark logo on a white background and a light logo on a black background. In these cases you will need to invert the colour of the logo and check it is clearly visible. It’s also important to know that the logo is recognisable without the important cue of colour.

Background test

Background test



Shape test

Testing your logo looks good in a variety of simple shapes is a good way to test how adaptable it is in different situations. You may need a circle shape for social media profile images, a rectangular shape for your website, and a square shape for your website favicon. Check to see if it fits into a circle, rectangle, square, oval, and other simple shapes.

Shape test

Shape test



Lockup test

Do you have an icon and a wordmark? If so, you want to explore different options so they can be used together in a variety of situations, such as landscape, portrait, square shape, etc.

Lockup test

Lockup test



Meaning test

Is there a meaning behind the imagery and lettering used in your logo? What do they represent? Be clear what your logo represents. It helps make your brand more memorable and connects it to your bigger purpose and brand story.

Consider potential interpretations of your logo and ensure there isn’t a chance for confusion or miscommunication. For example, if you want to show growth you might use an arrow or upward graph, but could that be misinterpreted for something else?

Meaning test

Meaning test



Touchpoint test

What are all the different touchpoints for your brand? Print materials, website, social media, merchandise?

Identify these touchpoints then check whether your logo can be applied in all the relevant touchpoints. Does it look good across the different touchpoints?

Touchpoint test

Touchpoint test



In conclusion, your company logo is an important asset in your branding toolkit. But, how do you know if your logo is doing its job? Performing these tests will help you understand if your logo is as effective as it can be and is serving your business to the fullest.

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